come along, pond

helshades:

a-geek-for-all-seasons:

helshades:

annabolina:

#you know thor is gonna go throw his room all ‘I USED TO HAVE ONE!’ just so he can give it to jane so she can take apart    #maybe he can’t find out and asks volstagg for one bc his kids have 300    #but also!!! THAT SOMETHING AS SIMPLE AS AN ASGARDIAN BALL IS SO ADVANCED    #and jane finds such wonder in it    #and even when she realised that it’s ball it doesn’t take away from it    #and thor doesn’t mock her for it    #he thinks it’s cute    #he’s definitely gonna find that ball    #he’s sure he had one    #maybe he broke it

Yeah, I can’t resist to reblog just to remind everybody that Thor fell for Jane Foster in the first place because she was so damn clever, and curious, and passionate about her work, and obstinate, and he was impressed and amazed and so touched to see the humans more resourceful than he thought and hey, here is another bit of Thor’s personality, he’s just so happy to have been proven wrong now that it allows him to see the best in people—

I just fail to understand why so many would dislike Jane Foster, and even more erase her character from their works; she is absolutely marvellous, both unbelievable and terribly realistic, adorable and awkward, driven but sweet, kind but relentless, and so fucking gifted. And there are people wondering why Thor is interested in her?! Argh!

Also this scene is quite wonderful: you have two people who had a crush on each other last time they met, but who have been unable to see each other since, and the current events are hardly allowing them to get to know each other better—and they kinda find themselves in the same situation they were last time, and you see how they reconnect and it’s just perfect. Perfectly untimely and a little bit tragic, too.

You see; this, this right here, is why I like them together.  Jane is utterly fascinated by this child’s toy and Thor thinks that’s amazing.  How someone could find wonder in something that he probably takes for granted.  This relationship doesn’t get nearly enough love in this fandom, because people are to busy hating on the female character that the main character loves.  And I really don’t understand that.  I think that, originally, Jane was sort of meant to be the audience substitute.  The person who asks all the questions that the audience might have about the world that Thor inhabits.  But the cool part about Jane is that she’s more than that.  She’s the kind of scientist who finds the universe an endlessly fascinating place, and all the things that she’s encountered through her relationship with Thor has opened her up to possibilities that no one on Earth has ever even dreamed of.  

TL;DR: Jane is one awesome Science Lady and she deserves more respect for that.

Not only is Jane the audience’s substitute, but she is the audience’s clever and curious substitute, something practically unheard of in a fantasy or sci-fi blockbuster; usually the role of the audience’s viewpoint is filled in by a male character who ends up being the saviour of the indigenous species, thanks to all his Earthly knowledge.

Jane is both characteristically human and extraordinarily curious, filled with joy at the prospect of learning something new. She doesn’t dread the unknown, she sees an opportunity to learn more about the world. This is so very precious, so damn positive. And the best thing is that it still feels completely effortless. People who claim she doesn’t have a personality clearly haven’t seen the same movies I have.

Perhaps not so strangely, Thor and Jane’s relationship when it comes to science reminds me of the best hours of Doctor Who, where an old and learned character from a terribly advanced civilisation took an evident pleasure in getting to see the universe anew through the virgin eyes of curious and eager companions.

Thor himself is a formidable and deep character, because he obviously loves to learn as well. He adapts incredibly quickly, and he’s all ready to transform a prejudice into a life lesson. You can visibly see that what attracts him in Jane is her strength, her strengths, and certainly not the prospect of hovering over a frail and tiny human. When he looks at her, he doesn’t see tiny, he doesn’t see petty and ignorant; on the contrary, he sees greatness in mind and in potential.

This is such an unusual way of portraying romantic relationships, you have no idea. It makes me so angry to see people in the fandom retort that Jane is no role model for them because she’s too good, or because she’s not Asgardian, or because she’s not Loki. She is both exceptional and so laughably, so warmly human—typically human, but without the mandatory arrogance that clings to male characters in similar situations.

#Foster’s Fellows indeed.

8 hours agocaptainofalltheshipsthor-cat 45,337 notes#jane foster
I think I found my soulmate??? He’s British and likes to read, it doesn’t get better than that.

I think I found my soulmate??? He’s British and likes to read, it doesn’t get better than that.

8 hours ago #tinder #books #reading #rain
fermatadevita:

basically.

fermatadevita:

basically.

8 hours agofermatadevita 109 notes

Getting really comfortable in bed and then having to pee IS ALWAYS THE WORST UGH

9 hours ago
9 hours agoflobotstardispuncturesque 415,409 notes

ja—mie:

sometimes i think about how i really can’t be with someone who doesn’t accept the overwhelming attatchment i have to harry potter and football (soccer)

9 hours agoja--mie 5 notes#YESSS #ME

President Snow’s Panem Address #2 - “Unity”

9 hours agoflobotstardismockingjaysource 31,363 notes

Why do people want to get married? It seems so scary making a huge commitment like that. It’s just so weird ugh

9 hours ago #thoughts #marriage #commitment
bookishandi:

padfootstolemycrumpet:


fuckyeahteddylupin:


Same mirror - same place - different orphan by *button-bird


*strangled cry*


NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO.
 
But also YES.
 
Because for me this is a pretty important part of the final battle. A lot of folks accused JKR of just wanting to kill people off, and Lupin and Tonks were one of the major “sins” in that category. But for me, one of the major themes of her books is vicious cycle of violence, and another is the ways ordinary people can break that cycle. It’s important that we know that Harry doesn’t stop all the pain, that he’s not the last war orphan. Just like the first War, parents and adults have to make choices, choices with consequences. 
 
Like James and Lily, Lupin and Tonks didn’t risk their lives to defeat Voldemort. They gave their lives for each other, because no one person should bear the weight of the sacrifice. They gave their lives for their son, who deserved a better world. They gave their lives for love, not for victory.
 
I think it’s important to see the ways Voldemort’s evil creates these cycles, children taken from their parents and parents taken from their children, again and again. I think it’s an important sobering note in the victory—yes, this time Voldemort is really dead, but there’s another baby this time, another infant who will never know his beautiful, wonderful parents because of Voldemort and his message of hate and violence. Another child who will grow up wondering where he came from, what his parents were like, what would be different if they were alive.
 
But it’s also beautiful that Teddy will have such a different experience. And his experience will not be different because Voldemort is “really gone.” His experience will be different because his grandmother will tell him about his brilliant mom. Because Harry will tell him about his wonderful dad. Because Harry will help him deal with his pain and loss, be a sympathetic ear who understands what it’s like to grow up without your parents. Because the Weasleys will welcome him as another grandchild, and he’ll grow up with Victoire to throw dirt at, and James as a little brother. His experience won’t be different because Harry won a war, it will be different because of love.
 
That’s the whole story of Harry Potter. Sometimes we have to fight for what’s right, but what really makes life worth living and what really changes the world isn’t magic or power or moral superiority. It’s love.

bookishandi:

padfootstolemycrumpet:

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO.
 
But also YES.
 
Because for me this is a pretty important part of the final battle. A lot of folks accused JKR of just wanting to kill people off, and Lupin and Tonks were one of the major “sins” in that category. But for me, one of the major themes of her books is vicious cycle of violence, and another is the ways ordinary people can break that cycle. It’s important that we know that Harry doesn’t stop all the pain, that he’s not the last war orphan. Just like the first War, parents and adults have to make choices, choices with consequences.
 
Like James and Lily, Lupin and Tonks didn’t risk their lives to defeat Voldemort. They gave their lives for each other, because no one person should bear the weight of the sacrifice. They gave their lives for their son, who deserved a better world. They gave their lives for love, not for victory.
 
I think it’s important to see the ways Voldemort’s evil creates these cycles, children taken from their parents and parents taken from their children, again and again. I think it’s an important sobering note in the victory—yes, this time Voldemort is really dead, but there’s another baby this time, another infant who will never know his beautiful, wonderful parents because of Voldemort and his message of hate and violence. Another child who will grow up wondering where he came from, what his parents were like, what would be different if they were alive.
 
But it’s also beautiful that Teddy will have such a different experience. And his experience will not be different because Voldemort is “really gone.” His experience will be different because his grandmother will tell him about his brilliant mom. Because Harry will tell him about his wonderful dad. Because Harry will help him deal with his pain and loss, be a sympathetic ear who understands what it’s like to grow up without your parents. Because the Weasleys will welcome him as another grandchild, and he’ll grow up with Victoire to throw dirt at, and James as a little brother. His experience won’t be different because Harry won a war, it will be different because of love.
 
That’s the whole story of Harry Potter. Sometimes we have to fight for what’s right, but what really makes life worth living and what really changes the world isn’t magic or power or moral superiority. It’s love.
9 hours agochalriepacefuckyeahteddylupin 79,695 notes#crying
9 hours agoholocats11mm 704,127 notes
?

wingedwraiths:

hobbitunderthemountain:

n-ori:

Misty Mountains (Violin Instrumental) 

Composer: Howard Shore

Arrangement: Taylor Davis

Film: The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)

KAT

#oh god oh god oh god #I CAN JUST SEE THE AFTERMATH OF BOFA #THE CAMERA PANNING OVER THE FALLEN #AND THIS IS PLAYING

TARAH NO

FUCK NO FUCK NO FUCK NO PLS NO

9 hours agoshmow-zowsfuckyeahmusicfromfilms 18,658 notes

theinvisibles:

A Game of Aesthetics 

9 hours agomarinashutuptheinvisibles 1,106 notes
graceebooks:

elfauno:

Finally, some good advice from Cosmo

im gonna reblog this 300 times a day

graceebooks:

elfauno:

Finally, some good advice from Cosmo

im gonna reblog this 300 times a day

9 hours ago-thegreyladyelfauno 171,136 notes

bigstupidbaby:

losing an argument when you are right just because the other person is too stupid to understand what you’re saying is probably one of the most infuriating things in the entire universe 

10 hours agosp0raadic 438,787 notes

hopsjollyhigh:

My sister’s school has a little awards ceremony for the theatre kids and a category is “best villain in a musical” and AIDS from rent won so they had to redo the vote

10 hours ago-hewastheirfriendhopsjollyhigh 8,442 notes
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